Almost Perfect

2

April 3, 2013 by Isaac Hovet

HEADLINE: Texas 7, Houston 0: Darvish loses perfect game with two outs in ninth

There will be 4,860 Major League Baseball games this season. That is 262,440 outs to be made in 43,740 innings of baseball.

Yu Darvish, starting pitcher for the Texas Rangers, will probably pitch around 200 innings by the end of the long professional baseball season.

On Tuesday, the second day of the season, he almost did what only has been done 24 23 times in the history of Major League Baseball: pitch a perfect 9 inning game.

A perfect game by a pitcher means that no one reaches base: no walks, no hits and no errors (thank you fielders). It is astounding to think that, with all of the dominating pitchers in MLB history, there have been so few perfect games.

That’s because it is so difficult. A pitcher must hurl a small, stitched sphere 60′ 6″ into a zone 17 inches wide and 24-30 inches high. At the MLB level a pitcher cannot just place the ball in the middle of that zone, but must alternate speeds and spins while aiming at small zones within the strike zone to keep some of the greatest hand eye coordination on planet earth from sending that sphere into mini-orbit.

Mr. Darvish was so close. 26 out of 27 outs had been perfectly attained. He was just a batter away. Sports fans around the world (Yu is Japanese) watched and listened as he hurled his last pitch of the game.

Smack. Hard grounder up the middle. Base hit. A normal, every day, not gonna see it on sports center single that became infamous in this young season.

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With a sigh, a tip of his hat and a smile, Yu was cheered off the field as he was replaced.

We sighed, tipped our hats and turned the channel. So close.

Almost.

We can relate to almost. Unfortunately, we have too many almosts in our lives. Almost finished, almost hung in there, almost followed through, almost held my cool, almost stayed, almost said no, almost said yes, almost paid it off, almost kept my word, almost was on time. Almost.

For those of us who are Christians, we’ve recognized our almostishness. We know we fall short, we mess up, we lash out, we indulge, slip up, fall out and regularly make a mess of life. But, we accept grace, do overs and trust God to mend the wounds we’ve caused and received that are bigger than an “I’m sorry.”

Let’s call a day an inning. It is probable that you’re going to live 27,735 days. Good luck stringing nine of those together in perfection.

Almost.

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2 thoughts on “Almost Perfect

  1. Nice article. Actually there have only been 23 perfect games thrown in history.

  2. Isaac Hovet says:

    Thanks Michael! I will fix!

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